In the Phaedrus, Plato (through his mouthpiece, Socrates) shares the allegory of the chariot to explain the tripartite nature of the human soul or psyche. The chariot is pulled by two winged horses, one mortal and the other immortal. The mortal horse is deformed and obstinate.

Why does Plato say the soul is like a chariot?

Plato compared the soul to a person driving a chariot pulled by two flying horses. One horse is beautiful and noble; it wants to soar into heaven. This horse is our finer spirit. The other horse is ugly and bad.

What are the three concepts of the soul according to Plato?

According to Plato, the three parts of the soul are the rational, spirited and appetitive parts. The rational part corresponds to the guardians in that it performs the executive function in a soul just as it does in a city.

What does allegory of the soul mean?

Basically, allegory describes the soul figuratively as a chariot, driven by a charioteer, and powered by two horses: a noble white horse and an ignoble dark one. The charioteer attempts to rise to the heavens and beyond, there to behold divine visions, but often doesn’t succeed, instead falling to earth.

What does Plato believe about the soul?

Plato said that even after death, the soul exists and is able to think. He believed that as bodies die, the soul is continually reborn (metempsychosis) in subsequent bodies. Plato divided the soul into three parts: the logistikon (reason), the thymoeides (spirit), and the epithymetikon (appetite).

What is Plato’s Chariot Allegory?

In the Phaedrus, Plato (through his mouthpiece, Socrates) shares the allegory of the chariot to explain the tripartite nature of the human soul or psyche. The chariot is pulled by two winged horses, one mortal and the other immortal. The mortal horse is deformed and obstinate.

Why did Plato create the allegory of the chariot?

Plato, in his dialogue Phaedrus (sections 246a–254e), uses the Chariot Allegory to explain his view of the human soul. He creates this allegory in the dialogue through the character of Socrates, who uses it in a discussion of the merit of Love as “divine madness”.

What is the main thesis of Plato’s tripartite theory of the soul?

Plato’s Tripartite Theory of the Soul holds that individual people differ as to their being ruled by desires, by being spirited and courageous, or by being open to what foresight and knowledge can follow from the exercise of reason.

What are the types of tripartite soul?

Plato defines the soul’s three parts as the logical part, the spirited part, and the appetitive part.

Why does Socrates think the soul is tripartite?

Because the motivation to drink and the motivation not to drink are opposites, Socrates thinks that they must belong to different parts of the soul. The appetitive part of the soul “bids” the person to drink, and the reasoning part of the soul “forbids” him to drink.

What are the three parts of the soul in the Republic?

reason, spirit, and appetite

According to the Republic, every human soul has three parts: reason, spirit, and appetite.

What is the main point of Plato’s Republic?

Plato’s strategy in The Republic is to first explicate the primary notion of societal, or political, justice, and then to derive an analogous concept of individual justice. In Books II, III, and IV, Plato identifies political justice as harmony in a structured political body.

What are the three parts of the city in the Republic?

i. The tripartite soul

  • the logical, or rational, part;
  • the spirited part; and.
  • the appetitive part.


What is Plato’s view of the three classes of his ideal society?

Classes in ideal society



Plato lists three classes in his ideal society. Producers or Workers: The laborers who make the goods and services in society. Auxiliaries: Soldiers. Guardians/Soldiers: Those who keep order in the society and protect it from invaders.

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