What is Alastair Norcross’s example of Fred’s basement and what is it intended to show?

Abstract: In “Puppies, Pigs, and People: Eating Meat and Marginal Cases,” Alastair Norcross uses a thought experiment he calls “Fred’s Basement” to argue that consuming factory-farmed meat is morally equivalent to torturing and killing puppies to enjoy the taste of chocolate.

What does Norcross argue?

Journal of Animal Ethics

In “Puppies, Pigs, and People: Eating Meat and Marginal Cases,” Alastair Norcross (2004) uses a thought experiment he calls “Fred’s Basement” to argue that consuming factory-farmed meat is morally equivalent to torturing and killing puppies in order to enjoy the taste of chocolate.

What is the Texan’s challenge?

3. Texan’s challenge: One persons’s Modus Ponens is another Modus Tollens. –1. If its wrong to torture puppies, its wrong to support FF. –2.

Why does Norcross think the causal impotence objection fails?

We argue that Norcross’s responses ultimately fail to address the causal impotence objection. The former argument fails because it vastly oversimplifies the world in which we find ourselves.

Is Alastair Norcross a utilitarian?

Alastair Norcross is an associate professor of philosophy at the University of Colorado at Boulder, specializing in normative ethics, applied ethics, and political philosophy. He is a defender of utilitarianism.

What is Norcross’s main point in his essay?

Norcross believe that one should not eat meat that is raised in a factory. He uses an argument about torturing puppies and eating their brains. Although his argument about Fred and his extreme cruelty to feel the sensation of eating chocolate is cruel, it puts one in a state of mind to pay close attention to his point.

Why does Norcross think that nonhuman animals are moral patients?

Because humans are rational and non-human animals are not. Humans have different mental capacities that animals don’t have. – According to Norcross, we should reject the traditional view because of the marginal cases that are involved.

What does Norcross think is the relationship between being a moral agent and being a moral patient?

What does Norcross think is the relationship between being a moral agent and being a moral patient? a. All moral agents are moral patients, but not all moral patients are moral agents.

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